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Thread: Review: Steadymate Snowmobile Tow Strap

  1. #1
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    Default Review: Steadymate Snowmobile Tow Strap

    I have personally never had the misfortune of a sled that needed towing back to the parking lot due to a mechanical issue or some other problem. However, this is one thing that I am always prepared for. I figure the first time I go out without a tow strap Murphy will strike and I will need a tow. So many things can happen that would lead to this possibility that a good tow strap is critical in my mind. You also never know if a buddy or someone you come across may need some help as well.

    Previously I carried a 20-foot or so flat strap (nylon webbing) that I purchased at the local outdoor store. This strap is lightweight and can be used for all sorts of different scenarios. I also figured this would get me by in a pinch or emergency situation if I needed to fashion a tow strap. However, I was always a bit hesitant about it because I knew that it would be less than ideal, especially for a longer tow.

    After looking around at different options I stumbled across the Steadymate snowmobile tow strap from Kinedyne. It looked like a well thought out product that is simple in nature, easy to use and would provide a great towing experience (if there is such a thing). Knowing that Steadymate builds some of the best tie-downs you can get, and that Kinedyne makes commercial cargo straps and such, I knew that at a minimum the quality would be excellent. With this in mind I ordered one up.

    When the strap arrived my thoughts were confirmed. The components and build were first rate and the design was great. The Steadymate snowmobile tow strap is a snowmobile specific design that allows for full steering capability of both the tow rig and the sled being towed. It consists of two main components, a tow strap with a sewn loop at both ends and a spindle strap with a spring-loaded keeper hook and D-ring on each end.

    Set up is easy and takes seconds. You send the tow end through the bumper of the tow sled and pull the opposite end through the loop. This affixes the tow strap to the bumper and leaves you with a free loop at the opposite end. You then run the spindle strap through the free end of the tow strap. Once this is done you simply wrap each end of the spindle strap around each spindle and clip the spring-loaded hooks to the D-rings. It is a very simple operation that is very intuitive and is actually easier than it sounds.

    What you end up with is a bombproof tow set up. Additionally, since you are affixed to each spindle the sled being towed has steering capability and you are not damaging or relying on ski loops, bumpers, etc.

    After checking this all out the Steadymate tow strap went into my bag, hopefully to never see the light of day. No such luck.

    On December 23rd some friends and I were riding in the Bachelor area and decided to go grab some lunch at Elk Lake Resort. About 2/3rds of the way out we ran into a family of 4, with two small children, who had been sharing 2 sleds. One of the sleds had a mechanical issue and was on the side of the trail with its hood up. After doing our best at looking like we knew what we were doing we decided that it would be best to tow the sled to Elk Lake Resort and deal with it there. I felt bad for the family, but pretty excited inside because I could test out my new tow strap.

    Set up went perfect. After a minimum of fumbling the tow assembly up was in place. Rider logistics were figured out and we were on our way. The strap performed flawlessly (actual photos and towing video clip below) and was as easy to disassemble as it was to set up. The family was very thankful, and also very impressed by the tow strap. They mentioned that they would like to get one of their own.

    The Steadymate snowmobile tow strap is a great product, and is very fairly priced. At around $25 it is was not much more than my plain nylon webbing. Because it comes in two pieces the tow strap portion can be used as a strap or rope for other purposes. If needed, you could also attach the two pieces together in a variety of ways to come up with some creative and useful setups.

    Available at Steadymate.com and a variety of retailers.

    Short video clip of Steadymate tow strap in action:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KU50CyUwEBU
    Attached Images Attached Images         

  2. #2
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    I want to follow up to this with a little editorial. The family that was broken down by the side of the trail was there for 30 minutes before we stopped. While they did not try to actually flag anyone down, nobody stopped either. If you see someone who is obviously broken down, stuff unloaded, hood up, etc. at least ask if they need some help.

  3. #3
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    Looks like it works well. Thanks for the review.

    +1 on stopping, it could be YOU next time that needs a little help!!

  4. #4
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    Redmond, OR
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    I was out today for the inaugural run with the Mountain Max. I'm permanently paranoid from breaking machines previously I guess, or maybe I'm just more aware. So I didn't venture far from the sno park and thought about needing to be towed, or having to tow someone else. Dropped my sled off at a mechanic today for him to check some things that were beyond my capability and we discussed towing. He said put the strap on one ski so that it can steer itself and have the unfortunate rider ride on the operative snowmobile. Better traction for the tow vehicle and less dead weight on the other. What do you think?
    Trevor

    Fully addicted moto-junkie

  5. #5
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    Tie the one ski of the disabled sled directly to the tow sled tightly. No slack. This is by far the best way to tow a sled. Don't forget to remove the belt from the disabled sled.

    Quote Originally Posted by Petrolburner View Post
    I was out today for the inaugural run with the Mountain Max. I'm permanently paranoid from breaking machines previously I guess, or maybe I'm just more aware. So I didn't venture far from the sno park and thought about needing to be towed, or having to tow someone else. Dropped my sled off at a mechanic today for him to check some things that were beyond my capability and we discussed towing. He said put the strap on one ski so that it can steer itself and have the unfortunate rider ride on the operative snowmobile. Better traction for the tow vehicle and less dead weight on the other. What do you think?

  6. #6
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    the burg
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    i always carry a kit just about like that, once you've had to ride 20 miles back to the truck to get something to tow with you live and learn. imagine that, sleds break and need to be towed back. another good thing to have is a tow buddie, its a piece of plastic that goes under the skid in case the track is locked up.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boonedocker View Post
    Tie the one ski of the disabled sled directly to the tow sled tightly. No slack. This is by far the best way to tow a sled. Don't forget to remove the belt from the disabled sled.
    So tow from the ski loop? Or just link the ski to the tow rope? Seems smart to have the weight of the sled supported by the spindle or bumper, something strong. And then link the ski into that somehow so it can turn on its own and not need the dead weight of a rider.
    Trevor

    Fully addicted moto-junkie

  8. #8
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    Klamath, OR
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    So does anyone have a good experience with the Snobunjee? Personally I think paracord might be the answer...cheap and effective.
    2015 Yamaha MTX Turbo Viper

  9. #9
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    Tie it directly to the ski loop.

  10. #10
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    I've done it that way a few times. It was easier with steel skis, these days, skis are pretty fragile and you can tear the loops off some of 'em. I'm changing my method regarding towing from "tie it to the bumper" to an alternative method that tows at the spindles.

    I have a Snobunje Rattler, and it works as advertised. I like it for two reasons. It gets you in a more upright position to pull (better body mechanics, my Physical Therapist wife likes that part ), and it "stores" energy as you pull back, making your pull more effective.

  11. #11
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    Sutherlin OR.
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    I tow with a 8' rope tied to one spindle threw the ski loop to the bumper sled follows like a train !!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCDan View Post
    I have a Snobunje Rattler, and it works as advertised. I like it for two reasons. It gets you in a more upright position to pull (better body mechanics, my Physical Therapist wife likes that part ), and it "stores" energy as you pull back, making your pull more effective.
    SOLD!!! I've been in physical therapy too many times to ignore this info. That makes good sense. My back was killin me after pulling on the ski loop all bent over.

  13. #13
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    Come ride with us down south, you can borrow mine to get me unstuck as many times as you want

  14. #14
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    I have done it this way a few times. I have towed by the spindles once two. I understand BC Dans concern with the skis but I still prefer tying a ski up. I carry mule tape and make my own tow rope if needed. It's light and you can carry a bunch if you want too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boonedocker View Post
    Tie the one ski of the disabled sled directly to the tow sled tightly. No slack. This is by far the best way to tow a sled. Don't forget to remove the belt from the disabled sled.

  15. #15
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    Here you go!

    Wes Adams
    Mr.Triple
    Gotta have a Triple in the crowd!
    2000 Yamaha 700 Mountain Max
    2000 Polaris 1200 Triple Mod Sled
    2001 Polaris 600 Edge X
    2001 Polaris 500 SP
    ***2005 RMK Mod Sled, Triple, Homemade Tunnel***

    http://www.hillsideauto.org/

    www.facebook.com/HillsideAuto1

    http://www.amsoil.com/index.aspx?zo=1987784

  16. #16
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    all the sleds ive towed out and theres been many no one rides the dead sled just 2 short straps one attached to each ski then attached to the rear bumper of the tow sled .Then someone rides out double with the dude who brought the skidoo on the back of there sled !
    Last edited by Trex72; 12-29-11 at 10:55 AM. Reason: bad grammer

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trex72 View Post
    all the sleds ive towed out and theres been many no one rides the dead sled just 2 short straps one attached to each ski then attached to the rear bumper of the tow sled .Then someone rides out double with the dude who brought the skidoo on the back of there sled !
    Cant always ride 2 people on one sled. I'm a tall guy and I ride with other tall people. LOL So, that may not happen and especially on a newer Mt. Sled. JMHO
    Wes Adams
    Mr.Triple
    Gotta have a Triple in the crowd!
    2000 Yamaha 700 Mountain Max
    2000 Polaris 1200 Triple Mod Sled
    2001 Polaris 600 Edge X
    2001 Polaris 500 SP
    ***2005 RMK Mod Sled, Triple, Homemade Tunnel***

    http://www.hillsideauto.org/

    www.facebook.com/HillsideAuto1

    http://www.amsoil.com/index.aspx?zo=1987784

  18. #18
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    What if your track is froze up do you still put a rider on the broken sled ?

  19. #19
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    Thats true! I wont argue that LOL
    Wes Adams
    Mr.Triple
    Gotta have a Triple in the crowd!
    2000 Yamaha 700 Mountain Max
    2000 Polaris 1200 Triple Mod Sled
    2001 Polaris 600 Edge X
    2001 Polaris 500 SP
    ***2005 RMK Mod Sled, Triple, Homemade Tunnel***

    http://www.hillsideauto.org/

    www.facebook.com/HillsideAuto1

    http://www.amsoil.com/index.aspx?zo=1987784

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